Why Archie Is Hip

http://www.salon.com/2014/10/25/how_archie_went_from_dull_to_daring_the_worlds_tamest_comic_series_is_now_our_most_groundbreaking/

Best summary I heard “In Riverdale Anything Can Happen.”

I think there’s something to that. Archie in concept is tethered to certain ideas and characters who are archetypical. This in some ways is limiting, but as the characters are about very human situations, it is a human tether.  Archie’s situations are human ones – love, school, life, death, food (especially in the case of Jughead).

But because Archie has this tether, you can then go hog wild with it in a way. It always has a ground, so go nuts.  Team Archie up with the Punisher, have him fight Predator, explore alternate timelines, create the Legion of Archie.  Whatever works – Archie and company are still themselves.

In turn the series own limited focus – wholesome teams in their rather nice town – provides a limitation.  In some ways the best thing to do is go a bit nuts – and you can, as you have themes to work with and return to.

Finally the human-humorous grounding gives you fertile ground to experiment. The message of Riverdale is “Everyone belongs,” as we’ve seen with the groundbreaking Kevin Keller.  Everyone is a pretty wide berth to experiment with.

Glad to meet the new Archie, same as the old Archie, a difference we can all be glad is the same.

 

– Steven Savage

Steven Savage is a Geek 2.0 writer, speaker, blogger, and job coach.  He blogs on careers at http://www.musehack.com/, publishes books on career and culture at http://www.informotron.com/, and does a site of creative tools at http://www.seventhsanctum.com/. He can be reached at http://www.stevensavage.com/.

Skin In The Game

Trust requires sacrifice.  Someone has to be willing to give something up to be trusted. It’s a mixture of vulnerability, giving, economics, and communication.

Society is built around people making some sacrifices for the greater good – essentially as you cooperate you get more than you give.  Everyone builds trust by putting “Skin In The Game.”

But there’s always that desire to have no ties, no obligation, to be outside of the system.  It’s that dream – always unattainable, of being “separate.”  It never comes true, but people will build walls and castles and countries just to hope to have a bit of it.

When you want to be separate, you don’t want to put skin in the game.  Escaping that need is the very goal.  When you do that, how can you be trusted?

 
– Steven Savage

Steven Savage is a Geek 2.0 writer, speaker, blogger, and job coach.  He blogs on careers at http://www.musehack.com/, publishes books on career and culture at http://www.informotron.com/, and does a site of creative tools at http://www.seventhsanctum.com/. He can be reached at http://www.stevensavage.com/.

Steve’s Update 10/20/2014

Hello everyone, hope you’re doing well!

Not too much to update on here.  But . . .

Cooking-wise I’ve got an update coming on Depression Cake as I’ve found a way to make it FAR healtheir.  I’m also experimenting with vegetable smoothies.  I’ve got some ideas on how to post this and more, so stay tuned.

Borderlands The Pre-Sequel came out.  So if there’s any delays . . . well that’s one thing to blame.
– Steven Savage

Steven Savage is a Geek 2.0 writer, speaker, blogger, and job coach.  He blogs on careers at http://www.musehack.com/, publishes books on career and culture at http://www.informotron.com/, and does a site of creative tools at http://www.seventhsanctum.com/. He can be reached at http://www.stevensavage.com/.

Steve’s Update 10/13/2014

Hello gang, hope all is well!

First of all, my next Newsletter goes out this week – be sure to sign up!  It updates you on all my projects and has some monthly thoughts.

The latest Seventh Sanctum generator is out – the Creature Feature Generator.  It’s based on cheese modern monster films, so if you liked “Sharknado,” this is for you.

I’ve got another update to the Geek Catalog at Muse Hack.  Be sure to swing by for this ever-growing resource of getting Geek Involved – and some more special stuff may be coming.  Working on this has really taught me a lot about what we can do to make changes.

 

Steven Savage is a Geek 2.0 writer, speaker, blogger, and job coach.  He blogs on careers at http://www.musehack.com/, publishes books on career and culture at http://www.informotron.com/, and does a site of creative tools at http://www.seventhsanctum.com/. He can be reached at http://www.stevensavage.com/.

Those People Aren’t The Problem

You know the story.  Someone blames “Those People.”  Those people are lazy, those people are messing everything up, those people are the problem.

I have many friends who are troubled by people who are lazy, who are messing everything up,who cause problems.  Who is doing this?  Friends, family, partners, people they elected – anyone but “Those People.”

As long as we rail against “Those People” we ignore all the people causing us problems – those who affect our lives, those who really are involved in what we do, they have the power to create problems for us.

If we stop blaming “Those People” we’ll discover who we have to blame.

It may even be us.
Steven Savage

Steven Savage is a Geek 2.0 writer, speaker, blogger, and job coach.  He blogs on careers at http://www.musehack.com/, publishes books on career and culture at http://www.informotron.com/, and does a site of creative tools at http://www.seventhsanctum.com/. He can be reached at http://www.stevensavage.com/.

The Problem With Leaderless Movements

I hear about Leaderless Movements a lot.  Some seem to be good, some negative, some have purpose, some unruly mobs.

But at times I am suspicious of Leaderless Movements.  Why?

Because why assume they’re leaderless?

Humans organize, humans form structure.  There are leaders, of one kind or another.  The ones that truly want things to be leaderless reroute their power and use it to uplift and engage, so you don’t see them.  If their goal is a leaderless movement, they do this – prominent enough to show they’re not taking power.

There are no truly leaderless movements.  Take it from a manager.

Now, when you hear of a Leaderless Movement, ask yourself not if there are leaders (they are) but what are their goals?  Because there may indeed be leaders, and unless you are aware of them you don’t know their agendas, or goals, or reliability.

And “Leaderlessness” may just be a cover.

 
Steven Savage

Steven Savage is a Geek 2.0 writer, speaker, blogger, and job coach.  He blogs on careers at http://www.musehack.com/, publishes books on career and culture at http://www.informotron.com/, and does a site of creative tools at http://www.seventhsanctum.com/. He can be reached at http://www.stevensavage.com/.

Canal House Lentils

Yep, been on a cooking roll lately.  Three good recipes in one week!

This is actually a kind of breakfast lentil, originally a Japanese one. It’s pretty satisfying while being light. You can use it for more than breakfast – I had it for dinner with some polenta and cowpeas.

The 3 servings proposed are hearty servings more akin to a dinner. For a light breakfast break it into 4-6 servings.

Makes 3 servings.

Ingredients

  • 1 medium leek, white and light green parts, chopped.
  • 3 cloves garlic (1 tbsp) crushed.
  • 1 medium tomato, seeded, finely chopped.
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 cup green or brown lentils.
  • 2 tbsp soy sauce
  • black pepper
  • scallions
  1. Place leek, garlic, and tomato in pot and dry sauté, mashing the tomato as you stir. Add water as needed to keep ingredients from sticking.
  2. Continue sauté and mashing until the leeks are soft and the tomato is well mashed.
  3. Add water and lentils. Bring to boil, then reduce to simmer.
  4. Cook, covered, stirring occasionally until lentils soften (depending on the kind you use it can be 25-40 minutes), but are still al dente.
  5. Remove from heat. Stir in soy sauce.
  6. Serve. Sprinkle with scallions and black pepper to taste.

Steven Savage

Steven Savage is a Geek 2.0 writer, speaker, blogger, and job coach.  He blogs on careers at http://www.musehack.com/, publishes books on career and culture at http://www.informotron.com/, and does a site of creative tools at http://www.seventhsanctum.com/. He can be reached at http://www.stevensavage.com/.

Cocoa Peanuts

(Yeah been on a roll lately)

This is a simple recipe – and you can substitute any kind of nuts or seeds in for the peanuts. I like it as a healthy snack – the maple syrup doesn’t add many calories unless you’re really slamming it (keep it to about ¼ a cup or so).

You can scale this one up easily – just multiply the recipe.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup peanuts, unroasted, unsalted
  • 1 Tbsp maple syrup
  • 1 Tbsp cocoa powder
  1. Preheat oven to 325
  2. Mix peanuts and maple syrup in a bowl until peanuts are coated.
  3. Sprinkle cocoa powder into syrup/nut mixture gradually, stirring until it is mixed in with the syrup, and the peanuts are coated thoroughly. It will form a thick brown liquid that covers the peanuts.
  4. Pour mixture onto a cookie sheet and spread out.
  5. Cook for 10-15 minutes, stirring every 5 minutes until the nuts are dry – the pan may be a bit sticky still, but the nuts will be dry.
  6. Remove sheet, stir one more time to unstick. Allow to cool, then store in an airtight container.

Notes:

• Make sure you use a good non-stick pan – the mixture bakes on, but it comes off with a bit of soap and scrubbing.

Steven Savage

Steven Savage is a Geek 2.0 writer, speaker, blogger, and job coach.  He blogs on careers at http://www.musehack.com/, publishes books on career and culture at http://www.informotron.com/, and does a site of creative tools at http://www.seventhsanctum.com/. He can be reached at http://www.stevensavage.com/.

Not-So-Depression Cake

IMG_20141008_184828_311

This is a variant on Depression Cakes – cakes made without eggs or milk. They also have a parallel in cakes made during wartime, which used a variety of smart substitutions or interesting innovations. Frankly I consider it proof you can makes cake without milk or eggs – and applaud the innovators.

This one is made with chickpea flour for more protein and maple syrup for sweetness – not exactly things available in the times mentioned. The major challenge is stirring the flour to make sure it doesn’t lump up – try sifting it first.

Taste-wise it’s decent. Essentially think “scratch-made homemade cake” and you’re there. Nothing to write home about, until you realize you’re eating a gluten-free, vegan, chocolate cake made from bean powder.  Then it’s pretty awesome.

Ingredients:

Dry ingredients:

  • 1 ½ cup chickpea flour (you can use regular flour too)
  • 3 Tbsp cocoa powder
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • ½ tsp salt

Wet ingredients:

  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 1 cup maple syrup (you can use 1 cup sugar, but then mix it in with the dry ingredients and use 1 cup water below)
  • 1 tsp white vinegar
  • 4 tbsp oil
  • ¾ cup water

 

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees
  2. Mix all the dry ingredients together thoroughly. The cocoa powder helps determine if you blended it well – if the color is uniform, you’re good.
  3. Hollow out the center and 3 corners. In the center put the maple syrup, in one corner the vanilla, one the vinegar, and one the oil.
  4. Stir the ingredients together, blending the maple syrup and other “ends” together – saving the vinegar for last.
  5. Place in oven. Cook for 35 minutes until a toothpick comes out clean.

Steven Savage

Steven Savage is a Geek 2.0 writer, speaker, blogger, and job coach.  He blogs on careers at http://www.musehack.com/, publishes books on career and culture at http://www.informotron.com/, and does a site of creative tools at http://www.seventhsanctum.com/. He can be reached at http://www.stevensavage.com/.

Steve’s Update 10/5/2014

Hey everyone, so what’s been up? A LOT.

Last week I did Con-Volution. This is a hardcore, old-school SF con with a big focus on skills, writing, socializing, and development. I was on panels on religion and worldbuilding (amazing, has to be done again), general worldbuilding (very diverse), and general careers(with a focus on professional behavior). Going back next year and I recommend it to others who can make it – though it’s kind of semi-local. However I most strongly recommend looking their schedule over for ideas.

This weekend I did Kraken-Con. Spoke on how to Make Japanese Curry (I’m branching into Geek Cooking and this was successful) and my Fan To Pro panel. Great con and it’s twice a year – only it went from 800 people 6 months ago to about 2K estimated. I’m thinking this thing is gonna have to be one a year. Spectacularly well-run, I’m already planning to go back. Been there since it started.

My latest job series, “The Dark Side Of ‘Do What You Love’” is complete. It was a chance to explore some more negative approaches to my usual career advice. You’ll find it informative.

This week . . . well we’ll see how things go.  But I’m feeling pretty energized.  The cons gave me some great ideas . . . now I just need time to implement them.
Steven Savage

Steven Savage is a Geek 2.0 writer, speaker, blogger, and job coach.  He blogs on careers at http://www.musehack.com/, publishes books on career and culture at http://www.informotron.com/, and does a site of creative tools at http://www.seventhsanctum.com/. He can be reached at http://www.stevensavage.com/.